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Title:
Zodiacal exoplanets in time (ZEIT) - II. A `super-Earth' orbiting a young K dwarf in the Pleiades Neighbourhood
Authors:
Gaidos, E.; Mann, A. W.; Rizzuto, A.; Nofi, L.; Mace, G.; Vanderburg, A.; Feiden, G.; Narita, N.; Takeda, Y.; Esposito, T. M.; De Rosa, R. J.; Ansdell, M.; Hirano, T.; Graham, J. R.; Kraus, A.; Jaffe, D.
Affiliation:
AA(Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA; Visiting Scientist, Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, CH-3012, Switzerland), AB(Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA), AC(Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA), AD(Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, HI 96822, USA), AE(Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA), AF(Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA), AG(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-751-20 Upsalla, Sweden), AH(Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-0038 Tokyo, Japan; Astrobiology Center, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Mitaka, 181-8588 Tokyo, Japan; National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, 181-8588 Tokyo, Japan; SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Mitaka, 181-8588 Tokyo, Japan), AI(National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, 181-8588 Tokyo, Japan), AJ(Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA), AK(Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA), AL(Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, HI 96822, USA), AM(Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, 152-8551 Tokyo, Japan), AN(Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA), AO(Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA), AP(Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA)
Publication:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 464, Issue 1, p.850-862 (MNRAS Homepage)
Publication Date:
01/2017
Origin:
CROSSREF; OUP
Astronomy Keywords:
planets and satellites: general, stars: low-mass, planetary systems, open clusters and associations: individual: Pleiades
Abstract Copyright:
2016 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society
DOI:
10.1093/mnras/stw2345
Bibliographic Code:
2017MNRAS.464..850G

Abstract

We describe a `super-Earth'-size (2.30 ± 0.16 R) planet transiting an early K-type dwarf star in the Campaign 4 field observed by the K2 mission. The host star, EPIC 210363145, was identified as a candidate member of the approximately 120 Myr-old Pleiades cluster based on its kinematics and photometric distance. It is rotationally variable and exhibits near-ultraviolet emission consistent with a Pleiades age, but its rotational period is ≈20 d and its spectrum contains no Halpha emission nor the Li I absorption expected of Pleiades K dwarfs. Instead, the star is probably an interloper that is unaffiliated with the cluster, but younger (≲1.3 Gyr) than the typical field dwarf. We ruled out a false positive transit signal produced by confusion with a background eclipsing binary by adaptive optics imaging and a statistical calculation. Doppler radial velocity measurements limit the companion mass to <2 times that of Jupiter. Screening of the light curves of 1014 potential Pleiades candidate stars uncovered no additional planets. An injection-and-recovery experiment using the K2 Pleiades light curves with simulated planets, assuming a planet population like that in the Kepler prime field, predicts only 0.8-1.8 detections (versus ˜20 in an equivalent Kepler sample). The absence of Pleiades planet detections can be attributed to the much shorter monitoring time of K2 (80 d versus 4 yr), increased measurement noise due to spacecraft motion, and the intrinsic noisiness of the stars.

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Part  3     Part  1     Part  4     Part  5     Part  2     Part  6     Part  7    


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