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Title:
The XXL survey XV: evidence for dry merger driven BCG growth in XXL-100-GC X-ray clusters
Authors:
Lavoie, S.; Willis, J. P.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Gastaldello, F.; Smith, G. P.; Lidman, C.; Adami, C.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P.; Lieu, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Bongiorno, A.; Desai, S.; Elyiv, A.; Faccioli, L.; Gardner, B.; Garilli, B.; Groote, M. W.; Guennou, L.; Guzzo, L.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; McGee, S.; Melnyk, O.; Owers, M. S.; Poggianti, B.; Ponman, T. J.; Scodeggio, M.; Spitler, L.; Tuffs, R. J.
Affiliation:
AA(Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1, Canada ), AB(Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1, Canada), AC(Service d'Astrophysique AIM, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette, France), AD(Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva, ch. d'Écogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix, Switzerland), AE(INAF, IASF Milano, via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano, Italy), AF(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B152TT, UK), AG(Australian Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 915, North Ryde 1670, Australia), AH(Université Aix-Marseille, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille, France), AI(Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn, Germany), AJ(Service d'Astrophysique AIM, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette, France), AK(Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbach- strabetae, D-85748 Garching, Germany), AL(H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL, UK), AM(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B152TT, UK), AN(INAF, IASF Milano, via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano, Italy), AO(ESA, Villafranca del Castillo, Spain), AP(Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA), AQ(Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF, UK), AR(INAF - Observatory of Rome, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Rome, Italy<?Affilpagebreak?>), AS(Faculty of Physics, Ludwig Maximilian Universität, München, Germany), AT(Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita` di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna, Italy; Main Astronomical Observatory, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 27 Akademika Zabolotnoho St., UA-03680 Kyiv, Ukraine), AU(Service d'Astrophysique AIM, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette, France), AV(Australian Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 915, North Ryde 1670, Australia; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia), AW(INAF, IASF Milano, via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano, Italy), AX(Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany), AY(INAF, IASF Milano, via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano, Italy; Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), bat. 121, F-91405 Orsay Cedex, France), AZ(INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Merate, Italy), BA(Australian Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 915, North Ryde 1670, Australia), BB(Universität Hamburg, Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg, Germany), BC(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B152TT, UK), BD(Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia; Astronomical Observatory, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Observatorna str. 3, UA-04053 Kyiv, Ukraine), BE(Australian Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 915, North Ryde 1670, Australia; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia), BF(INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio, 5, I-35122 Padova, Italy), BG(School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B152TT, UK), BH(INAF, IASF Milano, via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano, Italy), BI(Australian Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 915, North Ryde 1670, Australia; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia), BJ(Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany)
Publication:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 462, Issue 4, p.4141-4156 (MNRAS Homepage)
Publication Date:
11/2016
Origin:
OUP
Astronomy Keywords:
galaxies: clusters: general, galaxies: elliptical and lenticular, cD, galaxies: evolution, galaxies: interactions, X-rays: galaxies: clusters
Abstract Copyright:
2016 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society
DOI:
10.1093/mnras/stw1906
Bibliographic Code:
2016MNRAS.462.4141L

Abstract

The growth of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) is closely related to the properties of their host cluster. We present evidence for dry mergers as the dominant source of BCG mass growth at z ≲ 1 in the XXL 100 brightest cluster sample. We use the global red sequence, Halpha emission and mean star formation history to show that BCGs in the sample possess star formation levels comparable to field ellipticals of similar stellar mass and redshift. XXL 100 brightest clusters are less massive on average than those in other X-ray selected samples such as LoCuSS or HIFLUGCS. Few clusters in the sample display high central gas concentration, rendering inefficient the growth of BCGs via star formation resulting from the accretion of cool gas. Using measures of the relaxation state of their host clusters, we show that BCGs grow as relaxation proceeds. We find that the BCG stellar mass corresponds to a relatively constant fraction 1 per cent of the total cluster mass in relaxed systems. We also show that, following a cluster scale merger event, the BCG stellar mass lags behind the expected value from the Mcluster-MBCG relation but subsequently accretes stellar mass via dry mergers as the BCG and cluster evolve towards a relaxed state.

Associated Articles

Part  5     Part  1     Part  2     Part  3     Part  4     Part  6     Part  7     Part  8     Part  9     Part 10     Part 11     Part 12     Part 13     Part 15     Part 14     Part 16     Part 17     Part 18     Part 19     Part 20     Part 21     Part 22     Part 23     Part 24     Part 25     Part 26     Part 27     Part 28     Part 29     Part 30     Part 31     Part 32     Part 33     Part 34     Part 35    


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