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Title:
Exocometary gas in the HD 181327 debris ring
Authors:
Marino, S.; Matrà, L.; Stark, C.; Wyatt, M. C.; Casassus, S.; Kennedy, G.; Rodriguez, D.; Zuckerman, B.; Perez, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Kuchner, M.; Hughes, A. M.; Schneider, G.; Steele, A.; Roberge, A.; Donaldson, J.; Nesvold, E.
Affiliation:
AA(Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK; Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D Santiago, Chile; Millennium Nucleus `Protoplanetary Disks', Chile ), AB(Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK), AC(Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA), AD(Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK), AE(Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D Santiago, Chile; Millennium Nucleus `Protoplanetary Disks', Chile), AF(Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK), AG(Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D Santiago, Chile; Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10034, USA), AH(Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562, USA), AI(Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D Santiago, Chile; Millennium Nucleus `Protoplanetary Disks', Chile), AJ(Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, 763-0355 Vitacura, Santiago, Chile), AK(Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA), AL(Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459, USA), AM(Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721, USA), AN(Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 230742, USA), AO(Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA), AP(Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 230742, USA), AQ(Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC 20015, USA)
Publication:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 460, Issue 3, p.2933-2944 (MNRAS Homepage)
Publication Date:
08/2016
Origin:
CROSSREF; OUP
Astronomy Keywords:
circumstellar matter, stars: individual: HD 181327, planetary systems, radio continuum: planetary systems
Abstract Copyright:
2016 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society
DOI:
10.1093/mnras/stw1216
Bibliographic Code:
2016MNRAS.460.2933M

Abstract

An increasing number of observations have shown that gaseous debris discs are not an exception. However, until now, we only knew of cases around A stars. Here we present the first detection of 12CO (2-1) disc emission around an F star, HD 181327, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations at 1.3 mm. The continuum and CO emission are resolved into an axisymmetric disc with ring-like morphology. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method coupled with radiative transfer calculations, we study the dust and CO mass distribution. We find the dust is distributed in a ring with a radius of 86.0 ± 0.4 au and a radial width of 23.2 ± 1.0 au. At this frequency, the ring radius is smaller than in the optical, revealing grain size segregation expected due to radiation pressure. We also report on the detection of low-level continuum emission beyond the main ring out to ˜200 au. We model the CO emission in the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium regime and we find that the CO is co-located with the dust, with a total CO gas mass ranging between 1.2 × 10-6 M and 2.9 × 10-6 M, depending on the gas kinetic temperature and collisional partners densities. The CO densities and location suggest a secondary origin, I.e. released from icy planetesimals in the ring. We derive a CO+CO2 cometary composition that is consistent with Solar system comets. Due to the low gas densities, it is unlikely that the gas is shaping the dust distribution.
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