Sign on
ADS Classic is now deprecated. It will be completely retired in October 2019. Please redirect your searches to the new ADS modern form or the classic form. More info can be found on our blog.

SAO/NASA ADS Astronomy Abstract Service


· Find Similar Abstracts (with default settings below)
· Electronic Refereed Journal Article (HTML)
· References in the article
· Citations to the Article (14) (Citation History)
· Refereed Citations to the Article
· Also-Read Articles (Reads History)
·
· Translate This Page
Title:
Catastrophic disruptions as the origin of bilobate comets
Authors:
Schwartz, Stephen R.; Michel, Patrick; Jutzi, Martin; Marchi, Simone; Zhang, Yun; Richardson, Derek C.
Affiliation:
AA(Université Côte d'Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire Lagrange, Nice, France; Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 0000-0001-5475-9379), AB(Université Côte d'Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire Lagrange, Nice, France), AC(Physics Institute, University of Bern, National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS, Bern, Switzerland), AD(Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO, USA), AE(School of Aerospace Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China; Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA), AF(Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA 0000-0002-0054-6850)
Publication:
Nature Astronomy, Volume 2, p. 379-382
Publication Date:
03/2018
Origin:
NATURE
DOI:
10.1038/s41550-018-0395-2
Bibliographic Code:
2018NatAs...2..379S

Abstract

Several comets observed at close range have bilobate shapes1, including comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/C-G), which was imaged by the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission2,3. Bilobate comets are thought to be primordial because they are rich in supervolatiles (for example, N2 and CO) and have a low bulk density, which implies that their formation requires a very low-speed accretion of two bodies. However, slow accretion does not only occur during the primordial phase of the Solar System; it can also occur at later epochs as part of the reaccumulation process resulting from the collisional disruption of a larger body4, so this cannot directly constrain the age of bilobate comets. Here, we show by numerical simulation that 67P/C-G and other elongated or bilobate comets can be formed in the wake of catastrophic collisional disruptions of larger bodies while maintaining their volatiles and low density throughout the process. Since this process can occur at any epoch of our Solar System's history, from early on through to the present day5, there is no need for these objects to be formed primordially. These findings indicate that observed prominent geological features, such as pits and stratified surface layers4,5, may not be primordial.
Bibtex entry for this abstract   Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences)


Find Similar Abstracts:

Use: Authors
Title
Abstract Text
Return: Query Results Return    items starting with number
Query Form
Database: Astronomy
Physics
arXiv e-prints