Sign on
ADS Classic is now deprecated. It will be completely retired in October 2019. This page will automatically redirect to the new ADS interface at that point.

SAO/NASA ADS Astronomy Abstract Service


· Find Similar Abstracts (with default settings below)
· Full Printable Article (PDF/Postscript)
· Scanned Article (GIF)
· Table of Contents
· References in the Article
· Citations to the Article (1) (Citation History)
· Refereed Citations to the Article
· Also-Read Articles (Reads History)
·
· Translate This Page
Title:
Direct imaging and spectroscopy of planets and brown dwarfs in wide orbits†
Authors:
Bonavita, Mariangela; Jayawardhana, Ray; Janson, Markus; Lafrenière, David
Affiliation:
AA(Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street M5S 3H4 Toronto ON Canada ), AB(Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street M5S 3H4 Toronto ON Canada), AC(Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street M5S 3H4 Toronto ON Canada), AD(Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada)
Publication:
The Astrophysics of Planetary Systems: Formation, Structure, and Dynamical Evolution, Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, IAU Symposium, Volume 276, p. 113-116
Publication Date:
11/2011
Origin:
CUP
Keywords:
brown dwarfs, planetary systems, stars: low-mass, stars: pre-main-sequence
Abstract Copyright:
(c) 2011: Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2011
DOI:
10.1017/S1743921311020035
Bibliographic Code:
2011IAUS..276..113B

Abstract

Recent direct imaging discoveries of exoplanets have raised new questions about the formation of very low-mass objects in very wide orbits. Several explanations have been proposed, but all of them run into some difficulties, trying to explain all the properties of these objects at once. Here we present the results of a deep adaptive optics imaging survey of 85 stars in the Upper Scorpius young association with Gemini, reaching contrasts of up to 10 magnitudes. In addition to identifying numerous stellar binaries and a few triples, we also found several interesting sub-stellar companions. We discuss the implications of these discoveries, including the possibility of a second pathway to giant planet formation.

Printing Options

Print whole paper
Print Page(s) through

Return 600 dpi PDF to Acrobat/Browser. Different resolutions (200 or 600 dpi), formats (Postscript, PDF, etc), page sizes (US Letter, European A4, etc), and compression (gzip,compress,none) can be set through the Printing Preferences



More Article Retrieval Options

HELP for Article Retrieval


Bibtex entry for this abstract   Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences)


Find Similar Abstracts:

Use: Authors
Title
Keywords (in text query field)
Abstract Text
Return: Query Results Return    items starting with number
Query Form
Database: Astronomy
Physics
arXiv e-prints