Sign on
ADS Classic is now deprecated. It will be completely retired in October 2019. This page will automatically redirect to the new ADS interface at that point.

SAO/NASA ADS Astronomy Abstract Service


· Find Similar Abstracts (with default settings below)
· Full Printable Article (PDF/Postscript)
· Scanned Article (GIF)
· arXiv e-print (arXiv:0911.4872)
· Table of Contents
· References in the Article
· Citations to the Article (12) (Citation History)
· Refereed Citations to the Article
· Also-Read Articles (Reads History)
·
· Translate This Page
Title:
The Sun and stars as the primary energy input in planetary atmospheres
Authors:
Ribas, Ignasi
Affiliation:
AA(Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5, parell, 2a pl, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain )
Publication:
Solar and Stellar Variability: Impact on Earth and Planets, Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, IAU Symposium, Volume 264, p. 3-18
Publication Date:
02/2010
Origin:
CUP
Keywords:
Sun: activity, Sun: particle emission, stars: activity, planetary systems, ultraviolet: stars, X-rays: stars, planets and satellites: general
DOI:
10.1017/S1743921309992298
Bibliographic Code:
2010IAUS..264....3R

Abstract

Proper characterization of the host star to a planet is a key element to the understanding of its overall properties. The star has a direct impact through the modification of the structure and evolution of the planet atmosphere by being the overwhelmingly larger source of energy. The star plays a central role in shaping the structure, evolution, and even determining the mere existence of planetary atmospheres. The vast majority of the stellar flux is well understood thanks to the impressive progress made in the modeling of stellar atmospheres. At short wavelengths (X-rays to UV), however, the information is scarcer since the stellar emission does not originate in the photosphere but in the chromospheric and coronal regions, which are much less understood. The same can be said about particle emissions, with a strong impact on planetary atmospheres, because a detailed description of the time-evolution of stellar wind is still lacking. Here we review our current understanding of the flux and particle emissions of the Sun and low-mass stars and briefly address their impact in the context of planetary atmospheres.

Printing Options

Print whole paper
Print Page(s) through

Return 600 dpi PDF to Acrobat/Browser. Different resolutions (200 or 600 dpi), formats (Postscript, PDF, etc), page sizes (US Letter, European A4, etc), and compression (gzip,compress,none) can be set through the Printing Preferences



More Article Retrieval Options

HELP for Article Retrieval


Bibtex entry for this abstract   Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences)


Find Similar Abstracts:

Use: Authors
Title
Keywords (in text query field)
Abstract Text
Return: Query Results Return    items starting with number
Query Form
Database: Astronomy
Physics
arXiv e-prints