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Title:
Standard Gain Horns for Solar Calibration
Authors:
Wielebinski, R.
Publication:
Proceedings of the Astronomical Society of Australia, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp. 62-64
Publication Date:
11/1967
Origin:
ADS
DOI:
10.1017/S1323358000010572
Bibliographic Code:
1967PASAu...1...62W

Abstract

The accuracy of the absolute value of solar flux depends on the temperature calibration techniques and the knowledge of the gain of the aerial used for the measurements. Recent advances in low-noise receivers, microwave components, and amplifier stability have reduced considerably the errors due to temperature calibration techniques. At present the knowledge of the gain of the aerial used for calibrations (usually a pyramidal horn) presents the largest source of doubt of an absolute calibration. Investigations of this problem suggest that a `standard gain horn' should be employed at all observatories in absolute solar calibrations.

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